Parental Influence on Students’ Career Choice and its Effect on Their Academic Performance. A Case of Schools in Rulindo District

Main Article Content

Mbonimana Gamariel
Byishimo Blaise

Abstract

The goal of this research was to determine the degree to which parental influences impact job choice and performance among advanced level students in Rulindo District, Rwanda. Additionally, the research intended to identify the interaction between children and parents in terms of profession choice and the value of collaboration. The research population consisted of all 2000 pupils enrolled in Rulindo's three elementary schools. The research surveyed a total of 108 pupils, and they all answered. Providing a response rate of 100%. Purposive sampling was employed to sample three schools in Rulindo District, while simple random sampling was utilized to sample the pupils. Questionnaires were employed to gather data. The data were analyzed using the Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) program. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics such as frequencies and percentages. Tables and graphs were used to show the findings. The study's findings indicated that parental variables had an effect on students' profession choices in Rulindo. These variables included the parents' greatest level of education, their employment, their beliefs and expectations, and their parent-child connections. The research advised that parents and children discuss higher level courses before to enrolling in them, emphasizing on the learner's strengths and preferences in order to minimize potential difficulties. This enables students to make informed job choices based on their educational attainment and professional goals.

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How to Cite
Gamariel, M. ., & Blaise, B. . (2021). Parental Influence on Students’ Career Choice and its Effect on Their Academic Performance. A Case of Schools in Rulindo District. Journal Educational Verkenning, 2(1), 13-19. https://doi.org/10.48173/jev.v2i1.98
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Articles

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